Applying Human Rights and Reducing Coercion in Psychiatry following Service User-Led Education: A Qualitative Study

Susanna Every-Palmer, Leah Kininmonth, Giles Newton-Howes, and Sarah Gordon Abstract Despite the imperatives to reduce coercive practices such as substitute decision-making, seclusion, and restraint, the psychiatric profession has struggled to realize these aspirations. Education delivered by people with lived experience of mental distress can help facilitate change. We introduced a service user-led academic program for psychiatry residents focused on promoting human rights and reducing coercive practices in mental health care.…

Charting the Rights of Community Health Workers in India: The Next Frontier of Universal Health Coverage

Janani Shanthosh, Andrea Durbach, and Rohina Joshi Abstract Community health workers (CHWs) have the capacity to bring essential health services to under-resourced communities. Globally, CHWs have made significant contributions to poverty alleviation, increased food security, and reductions in health inequalities. India’s one million accredited social health activists (ASHAs), the largest cohort of CHWs in the world, have been credited with increasing the rate of institutional deliveries and the uptake of…

BOOK REVIEW Decolonizing Public Health Requires an Epistemic Reformation

Volume 23/1, June 2021, pp. 297-299 PDF Bram Wispelwey Epidemic Illusions: On the Coloniality of Global Public Health, by Eugene Richardson, MIT Press, 2020 Physician-philosopher-revolutionary Frantz Fanon begins his chapter “Medicine and Colonialism” with the ideal setup for Eugene Richardson’s Epidemic Illusions: On the Coloniality of Global Public Health: “Introduced into Algeria at the same time as racialism and humiliation, Western medical science, being part of the oppressive system, has…

BOOK REVIEW Dissident Blood: Using Critical Feminist Study to Advance the Health and Human Rights of Menstruators

Volume 23/1, June 2021, pp. 293-296 PDF Caitlin R. Williams, Ashley Huff, and Benjamin Mason Meier The Palgrave Handbook of Critical Menstruation Studies, edited by Chris Bobel, Inga Winkler, Breanne Fahs, Katie Ann Hasson, Elizabeth Arveda Kissling, and Tomi-Ann Roberts (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) Half of humanity has personal experience with menstruation, spending approximately half of their lives managing their menstruation, yet it is only recently that “menstrual health” has received…

BOOK REVIEW Global LGBTI Rights: Between Homonationalism, Homoromanticism, and Homocapitalism

Volume 23/1, June 2021, pp. 289-291 PDF Kaveri Qureshi Out of Time: The Queer Politics of Postcoloniality, Rahul Rao, Oxford University Press, 2020 I teach a course in health and human rights at the University of Edinburgh. LGBTI rights are an important focus within the course. As highlighted by the Global Commission on HIV and the Law and the Lancet Commission on the Legal Determinants of Health, punitive laws, discriminatory…

Decolonizing Health Governance: A Uganda Case Study on the Influence of Political History on Community Participation

Volume 23/1, June 2021, pp. 259-271 PDF Moses Mulumba, Ana Lorena Ruano, Katrina Perehudoff, and Gorik Ooms Abstract This paper presents a case study of how colonial legacies in Uganda have affected the shape and breadth of community participation in health system governance. Using Habermas’s theory of deliberative democracy and the right to health, we examine the key components required for decolonizing health governance in postcolonial countries. We argue that…

Sanctioning Chile’s Public Health Care System for Not Providing Basic Services to the Elderly: The Inter-American Court’s Poblete Vilches Ruling

Volume 23/1, June 2021, pp. 251-258 PDF Ángela Arenas Massa, Marilú Budinich Villouta, and Carolina Riveros Ferrada Abstract This paper analyzes the Inter-American Court of Human Rights’ ruling in the case of Poblete Vilches et al. v. Chile. Poblete Vilches, a senior citizen, died in February 2001 due to septic shock and bilateral bronchopneumonia after being treated in a public hospital in Chile. The ruling held the state of Chile…

Gender Inequality, Health Rights, and HIV/AIDS among Women Prisoners in Zimbabwe

Volume 23/1, June 2021, pp. 225-236 PDF Nirmala Pillay, Dzimbabwe Chimbga, and Marie Claire Van Hout Abstract Zimbabwe has successfully reduced its HIV prevalence rate and AIDS-related deaths in recent years, but women, particularly those who are in prison, remain at high risk. Poor prison conditions, discrimination, stigma, and the neglect of the sexual and reproductive health of women prisoners living with HIV result in poor health outcomes for women…

Indigenous Birth as Ceremony and a Human Right

Volume 23/1, June 2021, pp. 213-224 PDF Ashley Hayward and Jaime Cidro Abstract Birthing can be an empowering experience for women. Within many Indigenous cultures around the world, birth is a ceremony to celebrate new life, acknowledging the passing from the spiritual world into the physical world. While initiatives to “indigenize” health care have been made, this paper argues that the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples…

Toward Human Rights and Evidence-Based Legal Frameworks for (Self-Managed) Abortion: A Review of the Last Decade of Legal Reform

Volume 23/1, June 2021, pp. 199-212 PDF Lucía Berro Pizzarossa and Patty Skuster Abstract Since the late 1980s, people have safely self-managed their abortions with medication, changing the landscape of abortion. This practice continues to evolve and expand and has been identified as a cause of decline in severe abortion-related morbidity and mortality. However, developments in medical abortion and self-management have yet to be reflected in the way abortion is…