“It’s about Rights”: The Bunya Project’s Indigenous Australian Voices on Health Care Curricula and Practice

Danielle Manton, Megan Williams, and Andrew Hayen Abstract Indigenous community-controlled health care organizations provide timely, sustained, and culturally safe care. However, their expertise is often excluded from health professional education. This limits the transfer of knowledges and protocols to future practitioners—those positioned to shape health care systems and practices that could achieve the health rights of Indigenous people and reduce health and social inequities. In Australia, despite national government commitments…

Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and Health Care System Responses for Indigenous Peoples: A Scoping Review

Sarah Larson, Cortez Standing Bear, Devon Olson, and Nicole Redvers Abstract Grounded in human rights approaches, truth and reconciliation commissions (TRCs) explore an event or process that did widespread and systematic intentional harm to a group of people. Health as a fundamental right is an important component addressed by TRCs. Yet despite TRCs often having recommendations for health care systems, it is unknown how well these recommendations are being translated…

The Council of Europe’s Underrated Role in Fostering Equitable Access to Quality Health Care in Times of Pandemic

Éloïse Gennet Abstract Different Council of Europe organs have been attentive and reactive to specific human rights issues in the COVID-19 context, quickly alerting on the risks of inequitable access to quality health care, vaccines, or medicines for vulnerable groups. Yet these reactions have mainly taken the form of nonbinding instruments such as declarations, statements, and recommendations. Although these reactions derive from the interpretation of binding Council of Europe conventions,…

COVID-19 Clinical Bias, Persons with Disabilities, and Human Rights

Volume 22/2, December 2020, pp 285 – 290 PDF Omar Sultan Haque and Michael Ashley Stein Persons with disabilities have historically been discriminated against by society, including fulfilment of the right to equal access to health care.[1] The more egregious practices, historically as well as today, include outright denials of access to health care, involuntary sterilization, forced institutionalization, coerced treatment, and substituted decision-making.[2] Discrimination also occurs by more insidious practices.…

UHC2030’s Contributions to Global Health Governance that Advance the Right to Health Care: A Preliminary Assessment

PDF Rachel Hammonds, Gorik Ooms, Moses Mulumba, and Allan Maleche Abstract The September 2019 United Nations High Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage (UHC) aims to mobilize top-level political support for action on UHC to advance the health Sustainable Development Goal (SDG). A driving force behind this meeting is the “UHC Movement,” led by UHC2030, which focuses on coordinating and amplifying efforts by WHO, the World Bank, civil society, and the…

PERSPECTIVE Universal Health Coverage: Are We Losing Our Way on Women’s and Children’s Health?

PDF Flavia Bustreo and Curtis Doebbler Our children are our future and one of the basic responsibilities is to care for them in the best and most compassionate manner possible.—Nelson Mandela[1] If women are denied a chance to develop their full human potential, including their potential to lead healthier and at least somewhat happier lives, is society as a whole really healthy? —Dr. Margaret Chan[2] This commentary argues that current…

Health and Human Rights’ Past: Patinating Law’s Contribution

PDF Thérèse Murphy Abstract This article argues that to be able to look forward, lawyers within the health and human rights movement need to do more looking back. It is prompted by a simple question: do we have a history of health and human rights law and lawyering? Finding nothing that qualifies, the article asks how we might fill that gap. Focusing on international human rights law, it prescribes histories…

Have Reforms Reconciled Health Rights Litigation and Priority Setting in Costa Rica?

PDF Alessandro Luciano and Alex Voorhoeve Abstract The experience of Costa Rica highlights the potential for conflicts between the right to health and fair priority setting. For example, one study found that most favorable rulings by the Costa Rican constitutional court concerning claims for medications under the right to health were either for experimental treatments or for medicines that should have low priority based on health gain per unit of…

Evaluating the Impact of Student-run Asylum Clinics in the US from 2016–2018

PDF Madison B. Sharp*, Andrew R. Milewski*, Claire Lamneck, and Katherine McKenzie Abstract Individuals applying for asylum must demonstrate a well-founded fear of persecution. By documenting signs of torture and other forms of abuse, medical evaluations can provide forensic evidence to support asylum claims. The backlog of pending immigration cases in the United States recently exceeded one million. Student-run asylum medicine clinics conduct forensic evaluations to assist in the asylum…

The Politicization of Abortion and Hippocratic Disobedience in Islamist Sudan

PDF Liv Tønnessen and Samia Al-Nagar Abstract In Sudan’s Islamist state, abortion is politicized through its association with illegal pregnancy. Fornication is a crime against God punishable with 100 lashes, and pregnancy outside a marriage contract constitutes sufficient evidence of a woman’s immorality. This enables a strong link between the crime of fornication and the crime of illegal abortion, to the extent that our interviewees often conflate the two in…