Health, Human Rights, and the Transformation of Punishment: South African Litigation to Address HIV and Tuberculosis in Prisons

Emily Nagisa Keehn and Ariane Nevin Abstract South Africa experiences the world’s highest HIV burden and one of the highest burdens for tuberculosis (TB). People in prison are particularly vulnerable to these diseases. Globally, and internally in South Africa, increased attention is being paid to HIV and TB treatment and prevention in prisons, with the public health community arguing for reforms that improve respect for the human rights of incarcerated…

A Comparison of Health Achievements in Rwanda and Burundi

Hari S. Iyer, Adanna Chukwuma, Jean Claude Mugunga, Anatole Manzi, Melino Ndayizigiye, and Sudhir Anand Abstract         Strong primary health care systems are essential for implementing universal health coverage and fulfilling health rights entitlements, but disagreement exists over how best to create them. Comparing countries with similar histories, lifestyle practices, and geography but divergent health outcomes can yield insights into possible mechanisms for improvement. Rwanda and Burundi are two such countries.…

Access to Medicines in Times of Conflict: Overlapping Compliance and Accountability Frameworks for Syria

Brianne McGonigle Leyh and Marie Elske Gispen Abstract Syria is currently experiencing the world’s largest humanitarian crisis since World War II, and access to medicines for emergency care, pain control, and palliative care remains shockingly restricted in the country. Addressing the dire need for improved access to medicines in Syria from an international law compliance and accountability perspective, this article highlights four complementary legal frameworks: international human rights law, international…

Political Priority for Abortion Law Reform in Malawi: Transnational and National Influences

Judith Daire, Maren O. Kloster, and Katerini T. Storeng Abstract In July 2015, Malawi’s Special Law Commission on the Review of the Law on Abortion released a draft Termination of Pregnancy bill. If approved by Parliament, it will liberalize Malawi’s strict abortion law, expanding the grounds for safe abortion and representing an important step toward safer abortion in Malawi. Drawing on prospective policy analysis (2013–2017), we identify factors that helped…

Adolescent Rights and the “First 1,000 days” Global Nutrition Movement: A View from Guatemala

David Flood, Anita Chary, Alejandra Colom, and Peter Rohloff The field of global nutrition has coalesced around the “first 1,000 days” concept, which prioritizes pregnancy and the first two years of life as a critical window to improve child health and development. In this Perspective, we explore the child-centric orientation of 1,000 days programs, with particular emphasis on its implications for young mothers. Using Guatemala as a case study, we…

Case Study: Degree of Integration of Disability Rights Into Allied Health Professional Education

Claire Bowley, Ann-Mason Furmage, Kanchan Marcus, and Stephanie D. Short Abstract Persons with disabilities are vulnerable to rights violations when accessing health care, including allied health care. However, the commitment of allied health professional education to disability rights has not been researched. This study is the first to investigate the extent to which disability rights principles are integrated into allied health competencies and education. Specifically, this paper explores the extent…

Inequitable Physical Illness and Premature Mortality for People with Severe Mental Illness in Australia: A Social Analysis

Melanie Edmunds Abstract Australians with severe mental illness experience inequitably high rates of physical illness and shortened life expectancy compared to the general population. A social analysis of this phenomenon incorporating a precis of historical and contemporary public health approaches reveals persistent discrimination and entrenched social disadvantage influencing access to appropriate physical health care. People with severe mental illness in Australia are among the most vulnerable and marginalized populations in…

Letter to the Editor: The Rule of Law as a Social Determinant of Health

O.B.K. Dingake This letter to the editor is based on the author’s address to the World Justice Forum in The Hague, July 10-13, 2017. The author spoke in his capacity as co-chair of the African Think Tank on HIV, Health, and Social Justice and president of the Africa Judges Forum on HIV, Human Rights, and the Law. It has been submitted in response to the Health and Human Rights Journal…

Letter to the Editor Response: Much to Debate About Conscientious Objection

Wendy Chavkin, Laurel Swerdlow, and Jocelyn Fifield Because Christian Fiala and Joyce Arthur absolutely oppose conscientious objection (CO) to abortion, they reject our very research question.1 We were not debating the desirability of CO but, rather, evaluating the efficacy of laws and policies that regulate the practice of CO in countries in which CO to abortion is permitted by law. Regardless of Fiala and Arthur’s opposition, CO is lodged in…

Letter to the Editor: Refusal to Treat Patients Does Not Work in Any Country—Even If Misleadingly Labelled “Conscientious Objection”

Christian Fiala and Joyce H. Arthur We would like to point out some serious problems and contradictions in the study “Regulation of Conscientious Objection to Abortion: An International Comparative Multiple-Case Study,” by Wendy Chavkin, Laurel Swerdlow, and Jocelyn Fifield (Health and Human Rights Journal, vol. 19, no. 1, 2017). The study purports to show that it is possible to accommodate health care providers’ “conscientious objection” (CO) to legal abortion while…