Upcoming Issues

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All issues publish general papers in addition to Special Sections.

 

June 2017

Special Section on Abortion and Human Rights

Submissions now closed

Guest Editors: Alicia Ely Yamin, Paola Bergallo and Marge Berer  

December 2017

Special Section on Romani Global Diaspora: Implementation of the Right to Health

Special Section on HIV and Human Rights – Past, Present and Future

June 2018

Special Section on Neglected Tropical Diseases and Human Rights

Special Section on The Right to Health and Judicial Enforcement of Health Rights: Focus on Latin America

Special Section on Abortion and Human Rights

June 2017

The June 2017 issue of Health and Human Rights includes a special section on the intersections between abortion and human rights, and in particular the use of legal mobilization around abortion rights at domestic and international levels, edited by Alicia Ely Yamin, Paola Bergallo and Marge Berer. Topics could include:

  • Conceptual and theoretical analysis of the developments on abortion law and human rights in international and constitutional law throughout the world.
  • Socio-legal studies of legal mobilization and counter-mobilization on abortion rights exploring the role of actors such as the women’s and the human rights movement, health providers, conservative and religious groups, legal support structures, and political players. The studies could focus on the dynamics of national, sub-national, regional, transnational or international struggles for and against the right to abortion.
  • The challenges and outcomes of implementing abortion law and policy reforms through high impact litigation, abortion guidelines, social mobilization strategies and/or the harm reduction model put forward by physicians.
  • The effects and impacts – for example, in women, groups, public opinion, policies, rules and other contexts – of the different legal strategies for abortion deployed by progressive and conservative movements.
  • A critical examination of the experience and policies of particular countries as they have attempted to expand access to abortion through legal reforms and health policies.
  • Comparisons of health and legal abortion reforms adopted in different countries of the world. Sub-national comparisons within countries or between sub-national experiences of different countries.
  • The impact and consequences of policies criminalizing abortion, miscarriage, stillbirth and other reproductive rights for women and health care providers.
  • Efforts to seek redress on behalf of women who have been denied legal abortions or suffered from the consequences of unsafe abortions and on behalf of health care professionals who have been punished for providing safe abortions.
  • The feasibility, pros and cons of different approaches to decriminalization of abortion, taking account of current law and policy, the legal, public health, regulatory, cultural and psychosocial dimensions of criminalization, and the extent of support for law reform.

 

Romani Global Diaspora: Implementation of the Right to Health
December 2017

This Special Section will examine the implementation of the right to health in the case of Romani populations across the globe. It will draw attention to ongoing discrimination against the Roma and Roma-related groups in relation to realization of the right to health.  Articles will consider access to health among Romani communities in Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, and elsewhere.

Guest editors of the special section are Jacqueline Bhabha, Margareta Matache, and Teresa Sordé Martí.

Topics could include:

Implementation of the Roma right to health

  • Conceptual and theoretical analysis of law and policy perspectives addressing the right to health of Roma communities around the world. Authors may adopt a human rights perspective, investigating the availability, accessibility, acceptability, quality and accountability of measures designed to realize the right to health of Romani members of the population.
  • The challenges of addressing ongoing health inequalities and or tackling social determinants that hinder implementation of the right to health for the global Romani diaspora.
  • Activities and policy initiatives targeting Roma and Roma-related groups living outside Europe.

The non-discrimination principle in the implementation of the Roma right to health

  • An examination of discriminatory practices impinging on the access to healthcare of Roma and Roma-related groups throughout the world.
  • Consideration of intersectional discrimination,, including against Roma people with disabilities, LGBTI Roma, Roma children and youth, Roma women and girls, Roma migrants.

Strategies and tactics to realize the Roma right to health

  • A critical examination of health based initiatives, especially grassroots Roma-based initiatives pursuing Roma equal access to health.
  • The impact of different strategies and tactics employed by governments and civil society organizations to reduce health discrepancies between Roma and non-Roma populations and overcome discrimination in access to health rights.
  • Assessment of successful practices, strategies and players involved, the contexts in which they operate and challenges encountered at the time of implementation.
  • Comparison of Roma related health laws, policies and interventions adopted and implemented in different countries of the world.

The Health and Human Rights Journal is a peer-reviewed, open access journal under the editorship of Partners in Health co-founder Paul Farmer. It is published twice yearly by Harvard University Press, with new issues released in June and December. There are no publication fees unless authors can use open access publication grants.

Submission Details

Questions about this special issue can be directed to Margareta Matache at mmatache@hsph.harvard.edu or Carmel Williams, Executive Editor, Health and Human Rights Journal at HHRsubmissions@hsph.harvard.edu

HIV and Human Rights – Past, Present and Future

December 2017

Background

It is widely recognized that the HIV epidemic and response have played a critical role in the development and application of human rights in the context of health. In the past 35 years since the beginning of the global HIV epidemic, human rights have been used to challenge coercive measures against people living with HIV and those affected by the epidemic, to address discrimination, to secure access to HIV treatment and to compel governments to set up evidence-informed HIV prevention and treatment programs.

The language and tools of human rights have been invoked and used by HIV activists through advocacy and litigation that have cemented the applicability of civil and political rights in the context of health and established the justiciability of economic, social and cultural rights. Lessons from the HIV response demonstrate that respecting, protecting and fulfilling human rights do not contradict public health objectives, but contribute to advancing health. Further, the HIV response has shown that engaging those affected, including patients and communities, can greatly benefit public health responses.

While countries across the world recognize the importance of human rights in the response to HIV, some recent government responses to the epidemic have been anchored in biomedical approaches thus suggesting the fragility of human rights gains. Similarly, the persistence of punitive laws, policies, and practices hinder effective responses to HIV. In many contexts, laws and regulations are being used to restrict the ability of civil society organizations to operate and play their advocacy and monitoring functions in support of human rights and effective public health responses. Thus there are continuous challenges facing rights-based approaches to HIV.

The application of human rights lessons learnt from HIV to inform other public health challenges, such as the outbreaks of the Ebola and Zika viruses, has not yet been purposeful or clear. Critical reflections on the past, present and future of human rights in the context of HIV provides an opportunity to explore the challenges and opportunities for advancing human rights in health in the new Sustainable Development Era, and more broadly.

Topics could include:

  • Critical reflections on the contribution of HIV to the development of health and human rights, and its role in building a synergetic movement of health and human rights practitioners and activists.
  • Socio-legal studies on human rights challenges facing the response to HIV and affecting the implementation of rights-based responses to HIV, including in relation to key populations such as women, young people, prisoners, gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender persons, sex workers, and people who inject drugs.
  • Critical reflections on the successes and challenges of civil society, international organizations, and donors in advancing human rights in the context of HIV.
  • A human rights analysis of the achievements and challenges with the HIV response in specific countries or regions.
  • Critical reflections on approaches for advancing human rights in the fourth decade of the HIV epidemic and in the context of human rights and Sustainable Development Goals.
  • Conceptual, theoretical analysis and critical reflections on the application of the human rights lessons learned from HIV to other public health challenges.

Publication details

The Health and Human Rights Journal is a peer-reviewed, open access journal under the editorship of Partners in Health co-founder Paul Farmer. It is published twice yearly by Harvard University Press, with new issues released in June and December. There are no publication fees unless authors can use open access publication grants.

Submission details

  • Papers must be submitted by 28 February 2017  
  • Papers have a maximum word length of 7,000 words, including references.
  • Perspective Essays are also welcome. These can be up to 3000 words, including references.
  • Author guidelines are available on the website: http://www.hhrjournal.org/submissions/author-guidelines/.

Questions about this special section can be directed to UNAIDS Guest Editors Luisa Cabal at caball@unaids.org and Patrick Eba at ebap@unaids.org, or Carmel Williams, Executive Editor, Health and Human Rights Journal at HHRsubmissions@hsph.harvard.edu.

Neglected Tropical Diseases and Human Rights

June 2018

The diverse group of bacterial, viral, and parasitic diseases collectively identified as “neglected tropical diseases” (NTDs) are understood as both a cause and a consequence of poverty, causing physical and intellectual impairments, preventing children from attending school, and reducing economic productivity. NTDs can also be severely stigmatizing, isolating individuals from personal and social relationships, including, historically, with Hansen’s disease (leprosy), forcibly exiling individuals.

Recognition of the underinvestment in NTDs relative to their significant health, economic, and social impacts, has led to increased global attention and commitment to their control and elimination. In May 2013, the World Health Assembly adopted a resolution calling on Member States to intensify efforts to address NTDs with the goal of reaching previously established targets for the elimination or eradication of 11 NTDs. The resolution also called for the integration of NTD efforts into primary health services and universal access to preventive chemotherapy and treatment. NTDs were subsequently included in the Sustainable Development Goal #3 which called for an end of the “epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and NTDs” by 2030.

The World Health Organization has described a rights-based approach to NTDs, emphasizing the human rights principles of participation, nondiscrimination, and accountability.[1] In addition, Paul Hunt, the United Nations’ Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health from 2002 – 2008 addressed issues related to NTDs on country visits and in several reports to the Commission on Human Rights. Key issues raised by these reports included the importance of community participation; the obligations for governments, international organizations and the private sector (including pharmaceutical companies); and the need for transparency and accountability in NTD programs. Nonetheless, few NTD programs have adopted explicit human rights approaches and few human rights scholars have engaged with the issue of NTDs and human rights.

Publication Details

The special section will be edited by Joseph Amon, Vice President for NTDs at Helen Keller International, David Addiss, Senior Science and Strategy Advisor at the Task Force for Global Health, and Alvaro Bermejo, Executive Director for Survive and Thrive at Children’s Investment Fund Foundation.

Health and Human Rights Journal is a peer-reviewed, open access journal under the editorship of Partners in Health co-founder Paul Farmer. It is published twice yearly by Harvard University Press, with new issues released in June and December. There are no publication fees unless authors can use open access publication grants.

Paper Topics

Potential paper topics will focus specifically on NTDs and the right to health. Topics might include:

  • Specific case studies where rights-based approaches were used, including, for example, NTD program efforts to ensure community participation, or gender-based NTD efforts
  • Strengthening health systems to improve their capacity to respond to the human rights entitlements of people living with NTDs
  • Human rights based accountability mechanisms related to NTDs
  • Human rights informed advocacy efforts to expand NTD programs
  • Examination of NTD-related stigma and discrimination
  • Conducting NTD programs in conflict regions
  • Addressing disability associated with NTD morbidity

Papers will demonstrate strong methodological approaches, high writing quality, and robust rights-based analysis.

Submission Details

  • Papers must be submitted by 31 October 2017
  • Papers have a maximum word length of 7,000 words, including references.
  • Author guidelines are available on the website: http://www.hhrjournal.org/submissions/author-guidelines/.

Questions about this special section can be directed to Joseph Amon at jamon@hki.org, David Addiss at daddiss@taskforce.org, Alvaro Bermejo at abermejo@ciff.org or Carmel Williams, Executive Editor, Health and Human Rights Journal at HHRsubmissions@hsph.harvard.edu

[1] http://www.who.int/gender-equity-rights/knowledge/ntd-information-sheet/en/

 

The Right to Health and Judicial Enforcement of Health Rights: Focus on Latin America

June 2018

Most Latin American countries have recognized the right to health in their domestic law (often in the constitution) or through international treaties (often both). Out of the current 21 countries that have ratified the new complaint mechanism of the UN Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) five are from Latin America (another four have already signed it). Latin America is also the region of the world with the highest levels of right-to-health litigation.

The definition of the content of the right to health has long been a source of contention, as has the role of courts in enforcing those contours. Depending on how it is defined, some argue it may come into conflict with other ideas in global health, such as efforts to achieve Universal Health Coverage, as well as equity in prioritizing health interventions due to the limited nature of health resources.

‘Judicialization’ of health rights in Latin America has provoked intense scholarship conflicting reactions from scholars in different fields over the past 10-15 years. Some have criticized it for at times, worsening the already pronounced health inequities in the region. Others have argued that it offers an important means of state accountability and can work in favor of the most disadvantaged when done appropriately.

This Special Section will examine the advances in research methodologies and understandings that have been developed in studying the impacts of judicialization over the last decade, as well as normative issues relating to the implications of a right to health for health systems, including priority-setting processes.

Publication Details

The special section will be edited by Octavio Ferraz, Reader in Transnational Law at King’s College London and Alicia Ely Yamin, Visiting Professor of Law, at Georgetown University, Adjunct Lecturer on Law and Global Health at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, and Program Director of the Health and Human Rights Initiative at the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law.

Health and Human Rights Journal is a peer-reviewed, open access journal under the editorship of Partners in Health co-founder Paul Farmer. It is published twice yearly by Harvard University Press, with new issues released in June and December. There are no publication fees unless authors can use open access publication grants.

Paper Topics

Potential paper topics of special interest will focus on some aspect of the following topics:

  • Research methodologies and assessments of impacts, including and beyond health outcomes
  • Interpretations of the right to health and the role of priority-setting in the pursuit of the full realization of health-related rights
  • Experiences with structuring judicial remedies for health rights.

Papers may consider case studies from the region and/or discuss theoretical frameworks and concepts, with particular emphasis on their relevance for issues faced in the region.

Submission Details

  • Papers must be submitted by 31 October 2017
  • Research papers for this issue should have a word length between 4000 and 7000 words, including references.
  • Author guidelines are available on the website: http://www.hhrjournal.org/submissions/author-guidelines/.

Questions about this special section can be directed to Carmel Williams, Executive Editor, Health and Human Rights Journal at HHRsubmissions@hsph.harvard.edu

 

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